Johanna's Visions

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Today: Bob Dylan released “Another Side of Bob Dylan” in 1964 – 48 years ago

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This is an old post… redirecting to the lates…..

This was indeed Another Side of Bob Dylan, “complicated” love songs and only one “protest song” – Chimes of Freedom”. COF is filled symbolism & surrealism, not like his earlier “topical songs”.

Many “Dylan writers” consider it to be among his 5-10 best albums, I don’t. It’s a very important album, but I would not put it on top 10.

Tracks:

Side one

  1. “All I Really Want to Do” – 4:04
  2. “Black Crow Blues” – 3:14
  3. “Spanish Harlem Incident” – 2:24
  4. “Chimes of Freedom” – 7:10
  5. “I Shall Be Free No. 10″ – 4:47
  6. “To Ramona” – 3:52

Side two

  1. “Motorpsycho Nitemare” – 4:33
  2. “My Back Pages” – 4:22
  3. “I Don’t Believe You (She Acts Like We Never Have Met)” – 4:22
  4. “Ballad in Plain D” – 8:16
  5. “It Ain’t Me Babe” – 3:33

My fav Songs:

  • Chimes of Freedom
  • My Back Pages
  • It Ain’t Me Babe
  • Spanish Harlem Incident

From Wikipedia:

Another Side of Bob Dylan is the fourth studio album by American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan. It was released August 8, 1964 by Columbia Records.

The album deviates from the more socially conscious style which Dylan had developed with his previous LP, The Times They Are A-Changin’. The change prompted criticism from some influential figures in the folk community – Sing Out! editor Irwin Silber complained that Dylan had “somehow lost touch with people” and was caught up in “the paraphernalia of fame”.

Released August 8, 1964
Recorded June 9, 1964 at Columbia Studios, New York City
Genre Folk, blues
Length 50:37
Label Columbia
Producer Tom Wilson

Album of the day:

Other August-08:

  • Julian Edwin “Cannonball” Adderley (September 15, 1928 – August 8, 1975) was a jazz alto saxophonist of the hard bop era of the 1950s and 1960s.Adderley is remembered for his 1966 single “Mercy Mercy Mercy“, a crossover hit on the pop charts, and for his work with trumpeter Miles Davis, including on the epochal album Kind of Blue (1959). He was the brother of jazz cornetist Nat Adderley, a longtime member of his band.
  • Webb Michael Pierce (August 8, 1921 – February 24, 1991) was one of the most popular American honky tonk vocalists of the 1950s, charting more number one hits than any other country artist during the decade.His biggest hit was “In The Jailhouse Now,” which charted for 37 weeks in 1955, 21 of them at number one. Pierce also charted number one for several weeks’ each with his recordings of “Slowly” (1954), “Love, Love, Love” (1955), “I Don’t Care” (1955), “There Stands The Glass” (1953), “More And More” (1954), “I Ain’t Never” (1959), and his first number one “Wondering,” which stayed at the top spot for four of its 27 weeks’ charting in 1952. For many, Pierce, with his flamboyant Nudie suits and twin silver dollar-lined convertibles, became the most recognizable face of country music of the era and its excesses. Pierce was a one-time member of the Grand Ole Opry and was posthumously inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame.
  • David Howell Evans (born 8 August 1961), more widely known by his stage name The Edge (or just Edge), is a musician best known as the guitarist, backing vocalist, and keyboardist of the Irish rock band U2. A member of the group since its inception, he has recorded 12 studio albums with the band and has released one solo record. As a guitarist, The Edge has crafted a minimalistic and textural style of playing. His use of a rhythmic delay effect yields a distinctive ambient, chiming sound that has become a signature of U2′s music.
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